Regis & Lana's
Carr Family Tree

Regis J Carr

Regis J Carr

Regis the Elder, not Jack.

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Carr, Regis John: 1952 Darmstadt, Germany
Carr, Regis John: 1952 Darmstadt, Germany
Picture was taken by the elder presumably in the Darmstadt backyard. 
 
2
Carr, Regis John: 1956 at 515 Woodfin Road Warwick, VA
Carr, Regis John: 1956 at 515 Woodfin Road Warwick, VA
Regis is pictured on the porch of 515 Woodfin Road, Warwick, VA with the family dog, Boozie, which was short for Caboose suggesting that the family might remain at four children: Jeanne, Regis, Suzanne and Stephanie. Caboose "disappeared" from the household roster at about the time the family moved from Warwick. (Update September 2012: Suzanne indicates that two boys were given the dog who was then taken to live on a farm.) The family never had another real pet unless you count the meanest tomcat around, Woolly, that was allowed to take up residence in Annandale, VA. Well, meanest only after Dick Strohm's calico cat named Pansy. A pansy it certainly was not! The picture was long before the advent of auto-focus. 
 
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Carr, Regis John: 1974 Camp Hovey, Korea
Carr, Regis John: 1974 Camp Hovey, Korea
This photo of Regis was taken and printed by PVT John H Hogan who was the orderly room clerk of A Company, 23rd Infantry. John took good advantage of the Camp Hovey dark room to facilitate his hobby. 
 
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Carr, Regis John: 1975 Leesville, LA
Carr, Regis John: 1975 Leesville, LA
This photo was taken sometime after Regis' sister Suzanne left her 1974, TR-6 lemon with him while she headed for her first duty station as an Army nurse at the 121st Evacuation Hospital in Seoul, Korea. Within days of taking possession of the lemon the battery died, the passenger door failed to lock and the trunk lid failed to lock! And the paint in the engine compartment began to peel. Regis' own 1973 MGB was between the lemon and his trailer. Interestingly, only once did both British cars fail to function at the same time and that fortunately was for a brief period of time over one weekend. Disclaimer: When Regis arrived at Fort Polk from Korea (with an interim assignment at Fort Knox) there was no open BOQ room so he rented a 2-bedroom trailer in Watkin's Trailer Park about a 7-minute drive from his unit's orderly room - A Co, 61st Infantry. Watkin's was known as a party place for single officers and and had been that way since Vietnam days. While the park fit Regis' plans - a nurse and a doughnut dolly were both living in trailers within feet of his trailer - he made plans to move out when a roof leak during a rain storm and soaked the bottom of his pride Sansui speakers. With no better, empty trailers at Watkin's or apartments in Leesvile and still no open BOQ room, he bought his own trailer and negotiated to place it in a married-couple's park 1/2 mile to the west of Watkin's. He remained welcome in the new location, next door to a divorcee (no involvement except that he gave her his lawn mower when he moved), for another 12 months before going to flight school at Fort Rucker, AL. The trailer drew occasional visits by the Watkin's females, even if some came just to do their laundry in the only trailer with a washer/dryer or dine on his basic meat & potato fare. 
 
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Carr, Regis John: 1976 Fort Rucker Party
Carr, Regis John: 1976 Fort Rucker Party
Regis is captured at a Christmas party during flight training at Fort Rucker. 
 
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Carr, Regis John: 1976  Hanchey Field
Carr, Regis John: 1976 Hanchey Field
The TH-55 helicopter, in the process of preflight, is one that Regis flew during primary flight training. It had a gas engine, transmission belts, a magnetic compass and a radio. OK, it had few more instruments than the compass, but not many: temp, fuel & tachometer.

WIKI: While the Army hadn't found the Model 269 adequate for combat missions, in 1964 it adopted the Model 269A as its training helicopter to replace the TH-23 and designated it the TH-55A Osage. 792 TH-55 helicopters would be delivered by 1969 and it would remain in service as the Army's primary helicopter trainer until it was replaced in 1988 by the UH-1 Huey. In 1964, Hughes introduced the slightly-larger three-seat Model 269B which it marketed as the Hughes 300. The Hughes 300 was followed in 1969 by the improved Hughes 300C (sometimes 269C). This 300C introduced a more powerful 190hp (140kW) Lycoming HIO-360-D1A engine and increased diameter rotor, giving a payload increase of 45%, plus overall performance improvements. At the time of its replacement in 1988, over 60,000 Army pilots had trained on TH-55 making it the Army's longest serving training helicopter.  
 
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Carr, Regis John: 1977 A-220 Airfield Pass
Carr, Regis John: 1977 A-220 Airfield Pass
This pass was issued to the 2nd Aviation crews so that they could enter Airfield-220 that was across the street from the main gate of Camp Casey, Korea. The designation, 220 was often refered to as Second-To-None which was also the 2nd Infantry Division motto. All airfields and helipads in South Korea were numbered A-### or H-###. Outside the gate at the south end of the airfield was the Grand Old Flag Shop at which pilots would purchase mugs, Cokes and their drinking suits - a blue one-piece, zip-up item worn during special parties at the O-Club. There was one exception; one pilot (an odd duck) with an obsession with the red because his mother never let him wear that color...he was the only pilot of the roughly 70 pilots not in blue.  
 
8
Carr, Regis John: 1985 Fliegerhorst Kaserne, FRG
Carr, Regis John: 1985 Fliegerhorst Kaserne, FRG
This was a command photo taken at the Fliegerhorst Airfield. In 1937 the Luftwaffe built Langendiebach Fliegerhorst. Glider and nightfighter units of the German Air Force stationed there participated in the 1939 invasion of Poland and the 1944-45 defense of Germany against allied invasion. Multiple bombings by allied forces rendered the airfield unserviceable by the war's end. Under the name Fliegerhorst Kaserne, American forces occupied the facilities from 1945 until 2007 with artillery, aviation, ordnance, quartermaster, transportation, meteorological, and military police units. Online rumor: " I have been looking for info on Fliegerhorst Kaserne (Fliegerhorst Langendiebach - an old Luftwaffe airfield near Hanau, Germany now used by the US Army). There are apparently some underground bunkers there under the airfield which, now filled with water, at one time housed aircraft I spoke with a gentleman who had actually been in a sealed room near the old steam plant (accessed from there) & said there were rusty helmets, etc. in there & that CMD threatened them with UCMJ for trespassers. Tunnel entrances in wall of steam plant basement were later bricked over. My BN CDR also said there was a bricked-over entrance to a tunnel in the basement of his quarters on Fliegerhorst. There is a printed local history in the U.S. forces library in Hanau, which states that in 1979, a 2-1/2 ton truck fell through the street and uncovered a network of tunnels, equipment for pumping water on and off the airfield for concealment, and 3 underground bunkers on the airfield which contained aircraft parts and a lot of water. I used to be stationed there in the late 90s & found some "Suspicious areas", but nothing definitive." (http://www.lwag.org/forums/showthread.php?t=3354)

My own remarks about Flierhorst incuded this: " The fascinating aspect of the barrack was that it was constructed in the late 1930s to billet a German Luftwaffe unit. The basement we learned had an entrance to a web of tunnels rumored to extend to the other barracks and to the aircraft hangars almost a half-mile distant. Allegedly the tunnels enabled the German bomber crews to make their way back-and-forth to the airfield under protective cover. In the time since WWII, the space in the tunnels had been occupied with utility pipe and conduit making travel beyond a few feet impossible, not that some did not try!"  
 
9
Carr, Regis John: 1990 434 Victory Rd
Carr, Regis John: 1990 434 Victory Rd
The home was the first for Regis & Lana. During his first night there (before he married Lana) he learned of the railroad tracks that bordered the backyard when a locomotive idled there all night. Eventually the tracks were abandoned. This photo was taken in July 1990 after Regis contracted to have the driveway paved - finally. He and Lana sold it within weeks of the paving. 
 
10
Living
At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld. 
 
11
Living
At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld. 
 
12
Carr, Regis John: 2009
Carr, Regis John: 2009
This photo of Regis was taken at his brother Chris' house in Warrenton on the weekend that USN CAPT (Ret) Jack & Bev Slaughter celebrated their 70th wedding anniversary at Fort Meyers Officer's Club. They were the parents of Regis' high school girlfriend, Mary Frank. She failed to wait for him to graduate from USMA, opting instead to marry a USNA '72 grad that they both met when hiking in Golden, CO in the summer of 1970.  
 
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Carr, Regis John: 2010 with Stockdales at Brooks, GA
Carr, Regis John: 2010 with Stockdales at Brooks, GA
 
 


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